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  1. Microsoft and GSM Association promote 3G mobile telecommunications

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Microsoft and GSM Association promote 3G mobile telecommunications

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Yahoo!News reports that “Microsoft Corp. and the GSM Association are promoting 3G (third generation) mobile telecommunications by asking companies to build laptop PCs that automatically connect to the Internet wirelessly over mobile phone networks.  They’re hosting a contest challenging companies to design mobile phone-like connectivity into easy-to-use laptops aimed at mainstream users looking for a hassle-free device able to connect them to the Internet wirelessly anytime, anywhere.”

According to the Register, “DoubleClick, the massive internet advertising platform that recently agreed to be bought by Google, has been caught serving rogue ads designed to trick users into buying unneeded software.  The maliciously crafted ads originated with an outfit known as AdTraff.com. After holding itself out as a legitimate online advertiser, AdTraff tricked name-brand websites including CNN, The Economist, The Huffington Post and the official site of the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team to sign contracts to run ads, according to a DoubleClick manager. The publishers at these sites then uploaded the ad files to DoubleClick servers, which distributed the banners to end users.”

O’Reilly Windows Dev Center today has an interesting article which discusses who is more open: Google or Microsoft?  The article’s author, M. David Petersen, points out that only people with “*DEEP* pockets are really going to be able to use Android for anything other than hobbyist style tinkering” and since “you can do that same hobbyist-style tinkering with the Windows CE 6.0 source […] the difference [is] really about splitting hairs between the true meaning of ‘Free Software.’”

Internetnews.com writes that “[a] patent-infringement suit filed in a federal court in Texas last week claims the core technology behind Google’s search engine misappropriates the intellectual property of a Northeastern University professor and the startup he co-founded.  The suit alleges that Google’s database architecture infringes on the patent ‘Distributed Computer Database System and Method,’ awarded to Kenneth Baclawski, an associate professor of computer science at Northeastern and co-founder of Waltham, Mass.-based Jarg Corp. Jarg and Northeastern are named as the plaintiffs in the case.”

CNetNews.com has a useful article today on “[l]aunching your startup in Japan.”